“They cannot fire bullets into your words if you are silent. Silence is the strongest form of revenge. It drives people insane.”
— K.B. (via fingertipwords)
“I will hurt you for this. A day will come when you think you are safe and happy, and your joy will turn to ashes in your mouth. And you will know the debt is paid.”

Tyrion Lannister, Game of Thrones

(via kalon11)
“Heeuh we lah meh gancang”
— Urang keur keuheul

the-little-lion-that-could:

The Hawk in Paris - Freaks.
I’m absolutely in love with this song. 

un1c0rns:

Gravity: Sara Bareilles

“Scientific research has been conducted to show that sociopaths are particularly nonresponsive to negative consequences, and I have found this to be true in my own life. The threat of punishment at home or school only served as a challenge to figure out how to circumvent the consequences when I did what I wanted to do anyway. I didn’t fear the punishment, I just saw it as an inconvenience to work around.”
M.E. Thomas — Confession of a Sociopath : A Life Spent Hiding in Plain Sight

onlinecounsellingcollege:

What we refer to as a sociopath is officially a person diagnosed as suffering from antisocial personality disorder. This is the third time the name has changed. The original description was “morally insane.” This was later changed to someone with a “psychopathic personality” – before the most…

“I routinely disposed of people once their burden to me exceeded their utility”
— M.E. Thomas — Confession of a Sociopath : A Life Spent Hiding in Plain Sight
“The human mind has a primitive ego defense mechanism that negates all realities that produce too much stress for the brain to handle. It’s called denial.”
— Dan brown - inferno
bakerstr:

All my life I’ve been searching for distractions. And you were the best distraction and now I don’t even have you. Because I’ve beaten you. And you know what? In the end it was easy.
 
bakerstr:

All my life I’ve been searching for distractions. And you were the best distraction and now I don’t even have you. Because I’ve beaten you. And you know what? In the end it was easy.
 
bakerstr:

All my life I’ve been searching for distractions. And you were the best distraction and now I don’t even have you. Because I’ve beaten you. And you know what? In the end it was easy.
 

bakerstr:

All my life I’ve been searching for distractions. And you were the best distraction and now I don’t even have you. Because I’ve beaten you. And you know what? In the end it was easy.

 

(via bbcssherlock)

neurosciencestuff:

The Future of Brain Implants

What would you give for a retinal chip that let you see in the dark or for a next-generation cochlear implant that let you hear any conversation in a noisy restaurant, no matter how loud? Or for a memory chip, wired directly into your brain’s hippocampus, that gave you perfect recall of everything you read? Or for an implanted interface with the Internet that automatically translated a clearly articulated silent thought (“the French sun king”) into an online search that digested the relevant Wikipedia page and projected a summary directly into your brain?

Science fiction? Perhaps not for very much longer. Brain implants today are where laser eye surgery was several decades ago. They are not risk-free and make sense only for a narrowly defined set of patients—but they are a sign of things to come.

Unlike pacemakers, dental crowns or implantable insulin pumps, neuroprosthetics—devices that restore or supplement the mind’s capacities with electronics inserted directly into the nervous system—change how we perceive the world and move through it. For better or worse, these devices become part of who we are.

Neuroprosthetics aren’t new. They have been around commercially for three decades, in the form of the cochlear implants used in the ears (the outer reaches of the nervous system) of more than 300,000 hearing-impaired people around the world. Last year, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first retinal implant, made by the company Second Sight.

Both technologies exploit the same principle: An external device, either a microphone or a video camera, captures sounds or images and processes them, using the results to drive a set of electrodes that stimulate either the auditory or the optic nerve, approximating the naturally occurring output from the ear or the eye.

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